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Stanley Hagler | | Diamanté & Rhinestone Lizard Brooch
. . . . Whimsical!

$325.00  


Stanley-Hagler-Lizard-Brooch
Stanley-Hagler-Lizard-Brooch
Stanley-Hagler-Lizard-Brooch
Stanley-Hagler-Lizard-Brooch
Stanley-Hagler-Lizard-Brooch
Stanley Hagler

Once again Stanley Hagler delights us with such an imaginative creation. I never tire of searching through his designs. This is a large piece measuring approximately 4.5 inches in length and just under 2 3/4 inches in width (at its widest point). Of course the little lizard is the focal point of the brooch as his little tail dangles below. Decked out in rhinestones he is caught in mid-climb on a beautiful pink enameled brooch. Just to the left of the enamel leaf and topping this piece are two translucent green leaves giving the brooch even more dimension. Just below the green leaves is a large decorative clear flower. The remainder of this large brooch is an explosion of seed beads, rhinestones, prism beads, faux pearls and single diamantés topping the prism beads and rhinestones — all are set on a gold plated Russian filigree backing. As are all of Hagler's designs, this is so unique and such a beautiful creation. The brooch bears the Stanley Hagler N.Y.C. oval cartouche. It is in beautiful vintage condition as the photos clearly show and it would make such an awesome gift or an addition to any Hagler collection. ID-691

Measurements:
Brooch - Approximately 4 ½" long by 2 ¾" wide (at widest point).

$325.00  


 

Stanley Hagler Jewelry History —

Stanley Hagler was born in Denver, Colorado, in 1923. A veteran of World War II, he graduated from the University of Denver with a law degree in 1949. His design career began in the early 1950's on a dare, when he designed a bracelet "fit for a queen" for Wallace Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor. The result was a gold-plated bangle decorated with see earls which the Duchess-who loved precious an costume jewelry-fell in love with. She became a huge fan, piquing the interest of the style-conscious when she wore Hagler's bracelet to the Bal de Masque at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. At the insistence of the staff of Vogue magazine Hagler went on to reproduce the design using a profusion of multi-colored glass beads and flowers. He established the Stanley Hagler Jewelry Co. in New York's Greenwich Village 1953 with Edward Nakles. Vogue magazine followed his work with enthusiasm, and the Denver Post described it as "opulent and provocative" in 1956.

He worked as a business advisor to Miriam Haskell in the late 1940's and his jewelry was heavily influenced by Frank Hess's designs, with both designers favoring intricate floral motifs. Hagler also produced Oriental-inspired pieces and figural work, such as butterflies. However, he is perhaps best known for another Haskell theme—his faux baroque pearls, which displayed exceptional luminosity. Hand-blown beads were dipped up to 15 times in pearl resin, and individually strung to emphasize their quality.

Hagler's choice of other components was no less exacting: hand-blown "art glass" stones from Murano; Swarovski crystals in clear, vibrant pinks, coral, purples, and greens; rose montées; seed pearls and seed beads; and exceptional Russian gold-plated filigree all feature, as do more unusual materials such as carved-bone flowers. His work was hand-wired —"manipulated jewelry," as he described it to the Vintage Fashion and Costume Jewelry Club in 1995.

 
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